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Roman Trooper Helmet

AR0375

New product

The Roman Trooper is a helmet inspired by the classical legionnaire’s helm. Featuring ear-flaps, a brow bar, cotton inlay and an open face, this helmet is a comfortable solution without sacrificing vision or protection. The helm is reinforced with rolled-brass lining around the cheek guards and forehead, and embossed with floral brass rivets.

More details

Order in - Ships in 2-3 weeks

£ 94.99 tax incl.

Data sheet

Weight1.8kg
Width20cm
Depth22cm
Head Length30cm
Inner Circumference60cm
Crown Height16cm
Brim Width8cm
Visor Length14cm
Visor Width11cm

More info

You strike your sword against your rounded shield, shouting alongside your legionnaires outside the gates of Syracuse. Inside, their people are filled with terror, deafened by your army’s trumpets and noise. Arrows rain down and you and your fellow soldiers form a barrier with your shields.

There is nothing that can stop you. The design of your shield allows you to stand in close formation, advancing on their defenders and dispatching them quickly. Even if an arrow could find its way through the cracks, your Roman Trooper helmet will keep you protected.

DETAILS

The Roman Trooper is a helmet inspired by the classical legionnaire’s helm. Featuring ear-flaps, a brow bar, cotton inlay and an open face, this helmet is a comfortable solution without sacrificing vision or protection. The helm is reinforced with rolled-brass lining around the cheek guards and forehead, and embossed with floral brass rivets.

Secure the Roman Trooper helmet by tightening the leather strap beneath the chin, keeping the helmet in place. Made of 1 mm thick mild steel and top-grain leather straps and fittings, this armour piece is built to withstand the abuse of a LARP or reenactment with regular leather and metal armour care.

Available in sizes Medium and Large.

HISTORY

  • Considered to be a type of galea, often made from bronze
  • Specifically called an Imperial Gallic helmet used by Roman soldiers during the late 1st century BC through the early 2nd century AD

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